Issue 12: You Need a Friend

Melody WarnickUncategorized0 Comments

A few weeks ago, at the Virginia Festival of the Book, I did a placemaking activity where I had passersby fill out cards that said, “I live in ______________ and this is why I love it.” People dashed off answers like: “Diversity & inclusiveness! We welcome everyone!”—Decatur, Georgia “Because the people are welcoming and the food is delicious.”—Houston, Texas “It … Read More

Issue 11: Steal This Strategy

Melody WarnickUncategorized0 Comments

A woman I met told me about moving her family and her mother from California to South Carolina a few months ago, buying and selling “four properties in three cities in two states” in a whirlwind process that left her drained and exhausted. You wouldn’t blame her for holing up in her (river-view) study and practicing yoga breathing for 11 … Read More

Issue 10: The Third Way to Fall in Love with Your Town

Melody WarnickUncategorized0 Comments

There’s a study I talk up all the time that found that you’re most likely to be place attached if your city does three things well: social offerings, aesthetics, and openness. People tend to understand the first two. It’s the third one, openness, that causes problems. Even after I explain that openness means your city welcomes all kinds of residents, … Read More

Issue 7: The Good Kind of Resolution

Melody WarnickUncategorized0 Comments

People tend to feel passionately about New Year’s resolutions one way or the other. I’m quite in favor of them myself, spending the days around January 1 plotting how this year I’m actually going to do my resolutions, not just think about them. I bought this habit calendar from Kickstarter because I’d read that Jerry Seinfeld created an ironclad daily … Read More

Issue 4: Don’t Ask for Permission

Melody WarnickUncategorized0 Comments

Thomas Knox is a guy from New York City who wanted to get people to slow down and talk to each other. So as a social experiment, he dragged a table and some chairs down into the subway, set out a board game, and waited. People rushing for the trains eyed him warily, but after a few minutes, a stranger … Read More